Create a distressed finish

Distressed Finish

An authentic-looking, time-worn finish is very popular these days. Even better yet, this finishing technique is easy and very forgiving. Read on to learn how you can give your projects a great-looking, distressed finish.

Distressed Finish

The two main types of wood, softwood and hardwood, can be cut and sold differently. Softwoods are cut into standard “dimensional” sizes (such as 2×4 or 1×6), so all boards of the same size and wood species (fir, cedar, pine, etc.) are priced the same. Hardwoods (maple, oak, cherry, etc.) are also cut to standard sizes at home centers. Go to a specialty hardwood dealer, though, and hardwoods are cut into random widths and lengths and sold by the board foot.

Distressed Finish

Distressed Finish

Now comes the fun part—time to put on some paint! Applying a casual, distressed-paint finish offers a nice break from the much more demanding and time-consuming “formal” finish. When going for an old and well-worn look, the technique is easy and very forgiving. Highlighted below are two great options.

 

Distressed Finish

A good way to create this casual look is with the vibrant colors of traditional milk paint. It comes in powdered form and is mixed with water as needed. Milk paint is easily to apply, dries fast, and gives you a rustic, washed look that instantly adds authenticity.

To create a distressed look, choose two contrasting colors of milk paint. Apply a thin coat of the first color. Next, sand some surfaces and edges to bare wood and apply the second color. When the paint is dry, sand through to expose the first color and the bare wood, creating the aged look you desire. For a final touch, you can add a light brown oil stain to darken the bare wood and soften the bright color of the milk paint.

Distressed Finish

 

Distressed Finish

Another method comes from our friends at Shanty2Chic. They used petroleum jelly while painting to create a distressed look. For this technique, you will need two paints: a base coat and a top coat. For your base, you can use acrylic, latex, or spray paint. First, apply your base coat on any section of your project where you would like it to show through. For a more distressed look, give your entire project a base coat.

After the first coat dries, rub a little petroleum jelly on any surface you want to show through your top coat. Focus on corners and edges. The jelly will keep your top coat from sticking. After applying the jelly, it’s time for a top coat. Latex paint provides a great distressed look, but you can also use acrylic paint. Depending on the color, you may want to apply two coats.

After your top coat has dried, you can wipe off the areas where you put the petroleum jelly to add more wear. Use a sanding block or steel wool to sand down your project lightly, revealing more of the base coat and some bare wood. And that’s it, you’re done!

Distressed Finish

 

 

 

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